Business Leadership Skills 01 (Jul 09 - Feb 13)

Re: Business Leadership Skills

Postby winston » Mon Oct 08, 2012 6:41 pm

"Waiting is a trap. There will always be reasons to wait.

The truth is, there are only two things in life, reasons and results, and reasons simply don't count."

- Dr. Robert Anthony
It's all about "how much you made when you were right" & "how little you lost when you were wrong"
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Re: Business Leadership Skills

Postby winston » Tue Oct 09, 2012 5:48 am

Building a Successful Business Culture

It can be difficult to strike a balance between being your employees’ boss, and being their friend.

Here is the answer to creating an environment in which you can make your employees work hard, but remain happy and motivated at the same time.

http://www.yolohub.com/business/buildin ... ss-culture
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Re: Business Leadership Skills

Postby winston » Thu Oct 25, 2012 6:50 am

The Strengths and Weaknesses of Your Leadership Style
Author: Wealth Building Daily

There are many leadership styles and a cottage industry has cropped up around defining them. Gayle Lantz, president of WorkMatters, Inc., a human resources consulting firm in Birmingham, Ala., uses the popular DISC assessment tool to as part of her practice to identify leadership styles.

DISC, an acronym for dominance, influencing, steadiness, and compliance, uses a series of questions each with four answers.


Conductor. These leaders are direct, with a constant sense of urgency and focus on results. Conductors want to win, and often make quick decisions to get a competitive edge. The hard-charging style of these leaders drives change, values new ideas, and isn’t afraid of confrontation. As a result, conductors tend to get things done.

Be careful of: Conductors may be characterized as difficult or egotistical. Impatience and the desire to move forward quickly can lead to impulsive decisions or mistakes. Lantz cautions conductors to take a breath and not expect others to always work at the same pace.


Influencer. If you have an optimistic, motivational, people-oriented communicator on your team, chances are you’ve found an Influencer. These leaders are typically enthusiastic and in tune with other people around them. They like helping and motivating other people and have a natural ability to do so.

Be careful of: Influencers may be too verbose and have trouble staying focused. The can also be disorganized and easily led by others. According to Lantz, influencers need to be careful not to let their relationships and fears get in the way of making good decisions.


Supporter. Steady and unflappable, supporters tend to be the glue that holds their team together. It’s difficult to make them lose their tempers and they tend to be very loyal to those around them. They are patient, reliable and create a sense of calm and stability.

Be careful of: That same temperament that makes supporters such a stabilizing influence can also keep them mired in indecision and complacency. Because they dislike confrontation, they may avoid situations where it’s inevitable. Risk-aversion and procrastination can also trip up supporters in their leadership roles.


Analyzer. Smart and analytical with a penchant for following the rules, analyzers are those detail-oriented leaders who ask thoughtful questions and leave no stone unturned to ensure quality and accuracy. Their pace is typically slower than other types of leaders, but the job is going to get done right the first time.

Be careful of: Analyzers can suffer from “analysis paralysis,” letting their perfectionism hinder effective decision-making. They may fear mistakes or criticism of their work, so they want to make sure they have all of the information before moving forward.

They can be perceived as micro-managing or nit-picky, and need to be conscious of when they are over-thinking a situation and, instead, need to take action.

http://www.yolohub.com/business/the-str ... ship-style
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Re: Business Leadership Skills

Postby winston » Fri Nov 16, 2012 6:45 am

How Successful Leaders Balance Skepticism and Openness
Author: Wealth Building Daily

These four tips can help you encourage creative ideas while keeping your business safe.

1. Accept all ideas at first. At the beginning of a creative process, while you’re generating ideas, you want to be open to any and all suggestions. “For truly creative thought to occur, team members must believe it is okay to put forth different — often strange — ideas,” Hunter says. Cultivating an environment of openness will create a sense of safety.

Assume that every idea has the potential to be great. “A leader must serve as a champion of novel thinking in early stages,” Hunter says. A terrible idea could inspire a great one, so encourage people to take risks and give them a safe space to do that.

2. Aim to improve ideas, not criticize. Encourage a lively debate and strive to make ideas better. The original idea might seem outlandish, but you can raise specific concerns and solutions that help your team hone the idea. It’s an iterative process. With each improvement, the idea becomes stronger and more feasible.

Be wary if you find yourself nixing ideas as soon as they’re spoken. “Criticism too early is a sign that someone is resisting simply because change is difficult to manage and it may be more work for them,” Hunter says. Improve an idea as much as you can before you pass any judgment.

3. Create low-cost sketches or prototypes. After the initial brainstorm phase, pick out several ideas that are most exciting to your team. Choose a mix, including some that seem risky, and find low cost ways to test them out. “Spend some time letting that idea come to life,” Hunter says. “It has to be far enough along in development that a proper evaluation can be made.”

The key here is to test ideas quickly and cheaply. You might work on a low-cost prototype, sketch out a plan, or run it by a few focus groups. An idea that seems silly on paper may be highly effective in practice.

4. Be skeptical before you spend. Once you have a sketch or prototype, be as critical as you can. “The skepticism lens should be brought out when cost is about to incur,” Hunter says. The creative process is over at this point (or temporarily stalled) and practical concerns take precedence.

Gather all the information you have about each idea and judge how well each of them will help you reach your goals. Now is the time to be ruthless — a fun idea is not necessarily good business.

http://www.yolohub.com/business/how-suc ... d-openness
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Re: Business Leadership Skills

Postby winston » Mon Nov 19, 2012 7:38 pm

"Identify the essential. Eliminate the rest."

- Leo Babauta
It's all about "how much you made when you were right" & "how little you lost when you were wrong"
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Re: Business Leadership Skills

Postby winston » Tue Nov 27, 2012 9:31 pm

"The secret of business, especially these days, is to focus relentlessly on your unfair advantage - the thing you do that others don't."

-- John Rollwagen
It's all about "how much you made when you were right" & "how little you lost when you were wrong"
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Success University 13 (Aug 12 - Dec 12)

Postby winston » Sat Dec 01, 2012 8:20 am

Three Powerful Principles of Success by Brian Tracy

There are many similarities between business and war. In both cases, the victor is the one who uses superior strategy against his or her competition.

There are three principles of military strategy you can apply to your work every single day.

The first idea from the military is called the Principle of Maneuver. The principle of maneuver says that you should be clear about the goal, but be flexible about the process of achieving it.

According to the Menninger Institute, this quality of flexibility is the most important single quality that you will require for success in times of rapid change.


Be Open to Continuous Feedback

A key peak performance quality for you is to “accept feedback and self-correct.”

Peak performers are those who can take information from their environment and even if the information is contrary to all of their planning, they can accept the information, modify their plans, and continue moving forward.

They are always open to new ideas and insights.
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Re: Success University 13 (Aug 12 - Dec 12)

Postby winston » Sat Dec 01, 2012 8:21 am

continue ...


Learn What You Need to Know

The second military principle you can use is the Principle of Intelligence. This principle of intelligence means simply, “Get the facts!”

The most important thing in business decision making is for you to get accurate information. Facts don’t lie.

It is important that you get the real facts, not the assumed facts or the apparent facts or the obvious facts, or the hoped for facts, but the real, provable facts.


Make Better Decisions

Perhaps the key job of the executive is decision making. The quality of the decisions that you make will be in direct proportion to the amount of time that you take to gather timely and accurate information.

The very best thing that you can do, if you have insufficient information, is to delay making a decision at all.
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Re: Success University 13 (Aug 12 - Dec 12)

Postby winston » Sat Dec 01, 2012 8:23 am

continue ...

Invest Your Resources Wisely

The third military principle applied to strategic planning is the Principle of Economy of Force.

Economy of force means that you expend only the resources necessary to achieve the objective and not more.

It also means that you commit sufficient resources to achieve the objective once you have decided upon it.

Since your own personal energy is all you really have to invest over the course of your lifetime, the military principle of economy says that you should be very selfish when deciding how you are going to use yourself.

Keep asking yourself, “How important is this?” and more important, “How important is this to me?”


Action Exercises

Here are two ideas that you can apply immediately to be more strategic in your work and personal life.

First, remain flexible when you are working towards your goal. In times of rapid change, all of your best ideas can be contradicted by new information.

Be willing to try different things. Be open to new inputs and ideas.

Second, get the facts! The more and better information you can acquire before you make a decision, the better your decision will be.

The very best managers spend a good amount of time getting the real, provable facts before they take action.


Source: Brian Tracy International
It's all about "how much you made when you were right" & "how little you lost when you were wrong"
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Re: Business Leadership Skills

Postby winston » Thu Dec 20, 2012 9:47 pm

"Investment decisions or personal decisions don't wait for the picture to be clarified."

-- Andrew Grove
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