3D Printing

Re: 3D Printing

Postby winston » Fri Sep 28, 2012 7:01 am

How 3D Printing Could Save HP By Dana Blankenhorn

NEW YORK (TheStreet) -- I would love to believe Hewlett-Packard(HPQ) can become great again. It's a great brand that stands for engineering excellence, white shirts and pocket protectors.

At his blog, Terry Wohlers says 3D printing, or "additive manufacturing," has reached a tipping point, where it moves from being a niche market to a mass market. That's when HP walks away?

At Shaping the Future, Christopher Barnatt notes there are many types of 3D printers. The Stratasys units HP sold use "fused deposition modeling" or FDM - injection molding plastic goes in as a thread and is deposited into the input design. Other types of 3D printing include:
■ Stereolithographers, or SLAs, which use lasers to deposit layers of polymer that is hardened after it's deposited.
■ Polyjet matrix devices that spray two polymers from a print head to harden quickly under an ultraviolet light.
■ Selective Laser Sintering, or SLS, devices that fuse layers of powder together and can use a variety of materials from wax and nylon to stainless steel and aluminum.
■ SLS machines that use metals are sometimes called Direct Metal Laser Sintering, or DMLS machines. You can also make metal objects by using SLS to create a mold you pour metal into, a production method almost as old as civilization.
■ Selective Laser Melting, or SLM, will fully melt the powder being used in molding, not just fuse it together.
■ Selective Heat Sintering, or SHS, uses a thermal print head instead of a laser to heat the powder being melted as it is deposited.
■ Multi-Jet Modeling, or MJM, uses an inkjet print head to bind successive layers of fused powder together into a final form.

http://www.thestreet.com/story/11719888 ... L_btb_html
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Re: 3D Printing

Postby winston » Fri Oct 26, 2012 7:31 am

With ‘Safe Haven,’ Desktop Weaponeers Resume Work on 3D-Printed Guns By Robert Beckhusen

Three weeks after a group of desktop gunsmiths had its leased 3D printer seized by the digital manufacturing firm that owned it, the weaponeers have quietly restarted plans to build a gun entirely of printed parts.

The group has also begun expanding their operation with outside help, including space for ballistics testing provided by a mysterious firm involved in the defense industry.

http://www.wired.com/dangerroom/2012/10/wiki-weapon
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Re: 3D Printing

Postby winston » Sat Oct 27, 2012 7:55 am

Investing in 3-D Printing By Dana Blankenhorn

http://www.thestreet.com/story/11748859 ... L_ttt_html
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Re: 3D Printing

Postby winston » Sat Mar 09, 2013 8:33 am

Patient has 75 per cent of his skull replaced by 3D-printed implant

http://www.news.com.au/technology/patie ... 6593075470
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Re: 3D Printing

Postby winston » Thu Apr 04, 2013 7:40 pm

eking a market for cheap 3-D printers By Heather Kelly

(CNN) -- There is no shortage of amazing industrial commercial applications for 3-D printing -- internal organs, stem cells, artificial limbs, art, cars, customizable furniture.

But if you had a 3-D printer sitting on your desk at home, what would you make?

http://edition.cnn.com/2013/04/03/tech/ ... index.html
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Re: 3D Printing

Postby winston » Tue Jun 24, 2014 10:16 am

by behappyalways

Printing 3D houses in the Netherlands

http://www.aljazeera.com/video/europe/2 ... 33794.html
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Re: 3D Printing

Postby winston » Wed Jan 07, 2015 6:48 am

3D-printing company 3D Systems sinks 50%-plus over the past six months.
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Re: 3D Printing

Postby winston » Tue Jun 02, 2015 8:18 pm

Avoid popular "story" stocks… 3D-printing stock 3D Systems plummets 58% in one year.
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Re: 3D Printing

Postby winston » Wed Aug 05, 2015 8:08 pm

More bad news for 3D Systems… 3D-printing "story" stock plummets 36% in one month.
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Re: 3D Printing

Postby winston » Wed Sep 30, 2015 7:44 pm

The Future of Manufacturing Could Make You a Fortune By Paul Mampilly

The latticework metal bowl in Carl Bass' office is one of the reasons now is a great time to be an investor.

In their book, The Second Machine Age, Erik Brynjolfsson and Andrew McAfee tell the story of Bass repeatedly asking experienced metalworkers to guess how the bowl was made. But no one – not sculptors, ironworkers, or welders – could figure it out.

The answer was a 3D printer.

Bass, the CEO of Autodesk – a leading design-software company – designed the bowl on a computer using Autodesk's special software.

A fraction of a millimeter at a time, the printer's laser built up each layer of the bowl by fusing powdered metal in pre-programmed patterns. As the fused metal built on top of itself, layer by layer, a physical object took shape. All the printer needed was a digital file telling it what to build.

You see, to create a 3D-printed object, you start with computer-aided design (CAD) or computer-aided manufacturing (CAM) software – like the kind Bass' company, Autodesk, makes. You can think of CAD/CAM software as the 3D-printing world's equivalent of Microsoft Word.

Just like Microsoft Word allows you to write, format, and print a document, CAD/CAM software allows you to design a three-dimensional object completely on your computer. The program will create a design file that has all the details of the object. Then all you have to do is send the design to a 3D printer.

3D printers are designed to work with different materials… some use composites that are made of plastic, rubber, or silicon. But some 3D printers use metal or wood. They can make the actual object… or they can make molds and casts that can then be used to make many copies of an object for mass production.

A 3D printer takes whatever material it is using and deposits it one layer at a time into the shape that it has instructions to create. Depending on its complexity and size, a 3D-printed object can be finished in an hour or two… or it can take a day or more.

CAD/CAM software and a 3D printer can replace the small-scale workshop… It allows you to digitize the entire process of building an object. And it's much less costly and time-consuming than the trial and error of building and rebuilding prototypes the old-fashioned way.

Manufacturing companies are now using 3D printers to make both model parts and final parts. Auto body shops may soon be able to print out replacement parts for customers on the spot… eliminating the need to stockpile costly units.

The simplicity and low cost of this technology are allowing more and more businesses and individual makers to get their ideas past the concept stage.

There's an exploding community of 3D manufacturers and hobbyists called "makers." The origins of the maker movement can be traced to the early 2000s, when it began out of small-scale production operations in homes, garages, and small workshops. The movement is partly a reaction to mass-produced, standardized goods, and the perception that people are losing their ability to fix, invent, create, and innovate.

Until recently, it wasn't uncommon for people to fix their own cars, change their own oil, and even do major repairs. But if you've tried to work on a car made in the last five years… you might as well forget about it. So much of the car is sealed off that there's almost no way to even tinker.

At the same time, it has become easier to create customized car parts…

Jay Leno, the now-retired former host of The Tonight Show, is a collector of antique cars and motorcycles. A Los Angeles Times article claims he currently owns 130 cars and 93 motorcycles. In a 2009 Popular Mechanics (PM) article, Leno wrote…

One of the hardships of owning an old car is rebuilding rare parts when there are simply no replacements available… Any antique car part can be reproduced with [3D printers] – pieces of trim, elaborately etched and even scrolled door handles. If you have an original, you can copy it. Or you can design a replacement on the computer and the 3D printer makes it for you.
The first "affordable" 3D printers were introduced in 2007 and sold for about $10,000. Today, you can buy a 3D printer for as little as $250.

This accessibility sits at the heart of today's maker movement… Anyone can now design an object from their computers and test it for production. Every day, thousands of people are using 3D printers to make everything from toys to shoes to boats.

Etsy is an online marketplace dedicated to makers – it provides a space for specialty goods made from small-scale workshops and businesses that focus on craftsmanship. In 2014, the company generated $195.6 million in sales… 153% higher than the year before.

Another example of this movement is "Maker Faires." These events are like conventions for makers and their goods. And they're becoming a global phenomenon… In 2014, 215,000 people attended the flagship Maker Faire events held in New York and California's Bay Area. Globally, Maker Media (the company behind the Maker Faires) estimates that 781,000 people – from Norway to Japan to China – attended Maker Faire events last year.

I took my kids to a Maker Faire in Raleigh, North Carolina, last year. Almost everything shown that year – things like tools, beads, bracelets… and even robots – was made by a 3D printer.

Even if you don't own a 3D printer, you can still use one to create a prototype by sending your design to a 3D-printing lab. A lab is an even easier way to tap into 3D printing's potential… The company takes on all the costs and upkeep of the 3D printer, the customer just sends in the design.

In short, demand for these 3D printers and printing labs is soaring. Investors are standing on the brink of a manufacturing evolution…

Now, to profit from the 3D-printing evolution, you could buy big companies like General Electric or Boeing. These companies are using 3D printing to manufacture parts for aircraft engines and even planes themselves.

But to really set yourself up to make big gains from this trend, you need to own stocks that are 100% focused on 3D printing.

Source: Professional Speculator
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